Category Archives: Giveaway

And the winner is…

Thank-you so much to everyone who entered, re-tweeted, liked and looked at my very first giveaway! Sadly there can be only one winner…

I did this the old-fashioned way: wrote names onto paper, folded up really small so you couldn’t read them (even if DG could read!), shook them up in a container and gave to DG to choose one:

The winner is @aitcheldee Helen! Congratulations! Send me your address and the books will be winging their way to you later this week.

However, I prefer competitions where everyone wins, so I’m offering runners-up prizes to @liveotherwise, @playbythebook and @menain of your choice of Quentin Blake picture book from this selection:

Patrick, Snuff, Simpkin, Angelo, Mrs Armitage on Wheels, Cockatoos, Mister Magnolia, Mrs Armitage Queen of the Road, Angela Sprocket’s Pockets, Mrs Armitage and the Big Wave.

Please send me your first and second choice (in case you all chose the same one!) and address and I’ll post those out too. My e-mail is on the left hand side, or DM me on Twitter.

Again, huge thanks to everyone who looked and liked, and biggest thanks to the entrants. I wish I could send all of you the Martin Waddell books but I only have one copy of each 🙂

Picture Book Giveaway

To celebrate over 500 Twitter followers (wow), as a pay-it-forward thank-you for picture books I’ve been very kindly sent, and to pimp this blog and facebook page I’ve decided to run a small giveaway.

Any regular readers may have guessed I’m a teeny bit addicted to books. I like to support local independent bookstores and charity shops, but acquire books from many different sources. I recently purchased a Martin Waddell picture book collection from The Book People but we already had two of the books. These are what I’m offering as a giveaway 🙂

Martin Waddell writes a huge amount of varied books, many of which are well deserved classics. The two books offered in this giveaway are definitely classics: Owl Babies and Farmer Duck.

Farmer Duck (1991) is illustrated by the amazing Helen Oxenbury. It tells the story of a lazy farmer who overworks the poor duck, until the other animals come up with a plan. Beautifully illustrated and a firm favourite with children.

Owl Babies (1992) is illustrated by Patrick Benson (they also collaborated on one of my Fiction Fridays favourites, The Tough Princess). It is the classic tale of separation anxiety – three baby owls wake to find their mother missing and wait for their return. It’s probably the scariest scenario for small children but fortunately all ends well and Mummy Owl reassures that she said she would come back.

In order to be in with a chance of receiving these two books, you must have a UK address for the books to be posted to, and:

  1. Leave a comment on this post
  2. Follow Child-Led Chaos blog
  3. Like Child-Led Chaos on Facebook
  4. Tweet about this giveaway
  5. Write a blog entry about this giveaway

That gives up to five (optional) entries per person. For each entry, please leave a separate comment on this post. I’ll write the names and get MG or DG to pick one out randomly – nothing but the highest technology here! The closing date for entering this giveaway is midnight Monday 7th May. The winner will have one week to claim the books. I’ve not done this before so bear with me if I make mistakes!

Montessori Print Shop Giveaway From 1+1+1=1

Have I mentioned I like Montessori Print Shop? If you follow my twitter, you might notice I retweet them a lot! I forget when I first stumbled upon the site, probably via a yahoo group post on a Montessori list. To start with, I downloaded some of the free printables. Then I purchased a couple of the other printables when they were on offer. Then I bought files that were so much cheaper than wooden materials (and just as good for home use) and a teaching manual. More recently, the site has expanded its information and has a list of some of the best Montessori oriented blogs around, books worth reading, an idea of Montessori ‘curriculum’ (e.g. Maths), guidance on using Montessori principles at home, Montessori terms and theory in bitesized chunks, how to prepare and use their printables and not forgetting the blog full of activities, ideas, information and giveaways. Montessori Print Shop are very generous with their giveaways.

I have not been asked to write this post, I have not been given anything to write this, I’ve not even ever won a giveaway! I just wanted to share a resource I find really useful (even though I don’t utilise what I’ve learnt as much as I want to!) and share a fantastic giveaway.

Homeschool blog 1+1+1=1 is hosting a giveaway for the entire Montessori Print Shop catalogue: almost 1000 files. I’m not entirely sure I’d know what to do with them all, but I’d certainly have a go: my girls will love helping with the laminating and cutting 😆

I think this is a fantastic resource and a great giveaway. Click here to enter (but please let me win!) 😆

Montessori Madness! again!

Lori from Montessori MOMents blog is offering the Montessori Madness! book by Trevor Eissler in a giveaway. The rest of her blog is well worth reading too! Click here for a direct link to the giveaway.

See my previous post on why this book is worth buying. And because it’s so fab, here’s the video again:

Montessori Madness!

I first read about Montessori before I had any children or had started planning to have children and was ‘sold’ on the philosophy from the start. The more I read, the more involved in Montessori education I want to be.

Last week, I saw this video for the first time:

Ever since, I’ve wanted to share it with everyone I bump into. Trevor Eissler’s book, Montessori Madness is being offered in a worldwide giveaway by the fantastic Montessori Print Shop (load of info on their blog and site on use of Montessori principles, as well as printables that reduce the cost of buying materials that aren’t needed in a home environment). If the contents are anything like the video, it looks like a book I’ll be gently lending to all the parents I know (after I’ve devoured it myself) 😉

To enter their giveaway, click here.

My answer to the question Why is the best product in the world (Montessori Education) so poorly and timidly marketed? How can we change this? is: I think one of the problems is that anyone can use the word ‘Montessori’ without really knowing what it represents. When I told other parents that I was thinking of home educating using Montessori philosophy, many of the comments were along the lines that it’s very prescriptive (certain materials used in certain ways) or that Montessori ‘hated imaginative play’ or that it’s just for pre-schoolers. In the UK, we have an early years framework that requires play based learning until age 6 with children free to choose activities, so those parents who are aware of Montessori also think this is ‘the same’ as Montessori. Montessori schooling is considered an elite choice, so many don’t even think to look into it – and that’s from the small sub-set of parents who look into any alternative to State education for their children.

It seems strange that Montessori education should be such a ‘hard sell’ but I think sadly it is to do with cases where the word ‘Montessori’ has just been added to a school run by people with only a vague idea of what the philosophy is about. It seems like the connection between MMR and autism – there’s no link but people think it’s there because of media exposure; Montessori and hot-housing seem to be linked inextricably in people’s minds. The solution? I have no idea, but I think Trevor Eissler’s video is a very good step in giving the world a bite-sized introduction to what Education could be like.

But on thinking more, I wish I’d added that parents need to be made more aware of alternatives to state education, and that alternatives are not ‘hippy’ or ‘out there’ or just being alternate for the sake of it. How much media coverage is there on “X% of school/college leavers can’t <insert basic skill here>”? I don’t think the media is helping anything but instead of blaming schools, teachers,  parents, ‘the youth of today’ maybe more debate on the value of testing, tables, standardisation etc should be in the mainstream so that there are a variety of educational choices?